Thursday, August 10, 2017

Single Tickets on Sale Monday, including "UnStaged"

KSO Goes “UnStaged.”

If you like classical music and craft beer, we have good news for you. KSO is launching a new series of events, "UnStaged," where guests can expect to hear the KSO with craft beer in hand or while standing in the midst of the Orchestra in an airplane hangar, with sound “taking flight” all around. Contrary to the typical concert setting and structure, small ensembles of musicians will play several sets of 10-15 minutes of music throughout the night.

The first of these events will take place in November at The Standard at Jackson Row. Crafted for your pleasure, one beer tasting from four local breweries will coincide with each of the four musical sets, all surrounding the theme of “creating” or “crafting.” Click here to find out more or invite your friends on Facebook.
Keep Calm: All tickets go on sale August 14 at 9 a.m.
Monday morning, both season and individual tickets to all KSO concerts will go on sale. Tickets are available by web, phone, or in person. Patrons can buy tickets to an entire series or one singular show. During the week of Aug. 14, handling fees will be waived for purchases made over the phone.


Get Opening Night Tickets for Just $20.
During the week of August 14, patrons may purchase tickets to the KSO Season Opening Concert, Knoxville Postcards on Sept. 21-22, FOR JUST $20 by calling the box office. This special $20 ticket price includes seats anywhere in the Tennessee Theatre pending availability.
Not sure what you’ll like? Here is a quick guide. View the entire KSO concert calendar here.

This post authored by the KSO communications dept.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Concertmaster Chat: Q&A with William Shaub

This September, the KSO will welcome new Concertmaster William Shaub, who accepted the position in May after an audition and two guest appearances on the March and May Masterworks stage. You COULD read his bio here, but it would be more fun to read the Q&A below and hear directly from our newest addition to the KSO family. Enjoy!


Q&A with the new Concertmaster, William Shaub


1. What is the main role of a concertmaster? What does being a concertmaster mean to you?

The role of concertmaster is to serve as a musical representative to the community, on behalf of the orchestra. When the concertmaster first enters the stage to tune, we walk out to greet the audience on behalf of all the musicians; a wonderful tradition! The concertmaster also prepares bowings (making sure all the bows go in the same direction), helps to focus attention on different musical styles, and serves to communicate the artistic ideas of the conductor to the string section. Every once in a while, the concertmaster has a violin solo in a piece, but most of the time, I’m a member of the violin section. To me, serving as concertmaster means overseeing the overall orchestral sound with the intentions of the conductor in mind, and that means attentively listening to everybody’s part and not just my own.


2. What do you wish people knew about playing in an orchestra or being a full-time classical musician?


I think that most people approach music like a hobby, a pastime, or an interest--and that is wonderful. In fact, it’s why we do what we do! But to be a classical musician and performer, we are as precise and serious as a brain surgeon. We take brightening someone’s day with music very seriously. This is somewhat because that service in itself is enormously helpful in society: If you’ve had a hard day, we are here to soothe those stresses with our music. It is also because we are handling some of the greatest works of art ever made, and they deserve the formalities of our professional approach.


3. How often, on average, do you practice? When you’re tired or don’t LOVE a piece of music, what motivates you to keep going?


On average, I practice 4 hours a day and I take a day off about once per month. When I’m not in love with a piece of music, I try to fall in love with a little something about it. Maybe it’s a phrase or two in the piece, or perhaps it’s the end result of playing the work. Some pieces are designed specifically to make you better at your instrument. When I work with students, I often share the importance of starting the practice day (especially a day when you’re not up for practicing!) with a piece that you absolutely love--it could be anything from Star Wars to Schumann’s Piano Quintet. I believe that enthusiasm is a lifelong joy, it’s infectious and completely necessary towards developing an expressive technique.


4. Why Knoxville?

I first learned about Knoxville and the orchestra here when I met Gabriel Lefkowitz at the Spoleto Festival in Charleston (at the beach!) I would later find that this orchestra and this city is growing rapidly, with an energy that is really special. I discovered that the quality and professionalism of our orchestra in both the concert hall and the greater Knoxville region is second to none, and our nationally-renowned commitments to community engagement, education, and innovative programming fit with my vision as an artist. I was excited about the opportunity to be here!


5. Name something you enjoy about each of the following: playing in a small ensemble, playing a solo, playing in full orchestra/leading it as the concertmaster
.

In a small ensemble, I enjoy the intimacy and directness of communicating with other players. Playing a solo is wonderful because of the opportunity to fill a hall with my sound--it is an exhilarating mode of expression. When playing in a full orchestra, I get to hear the sounds of other instrument families and really listen to what they have to say. There is nothing like a brass chorale in the middle of a Mendelssohn symphony: you cannot reproduce that kind of magisterial moment with strings!


6. What experiences, in school or otherwise, have prepared you for the position of KSO Concertmaster?


After attending Juilliard in NYC, I was based in Houston for one year prior to coming to Knoxville and I auditioned for a spot on the artist roster of Da Camera Chamber Music and Jazz. With Da Camera, I performed in alternative venues throughout Houston, from hospitals and classrooms to new music and jazz hubs. Outreach became an every-week experience, and reaching new audiences was now a very real part of my life instead of just “a good idea.” I also made numerous recordings of great violin music for Da Camera’s Houston Methodist Hospital Video Series, which will be broadcast to patients on demand--a very heartwarming project. Reaching broad audiences is something I hope to do as a member of our orchestra, and my experience on this artist roster was good preparation.



7. What is something you’d like your fellow Knoxvillians to know about you?

I would like them to know that I am always happy to chat about sports. I am a big Cleveland Browns fan (I am originally from Canton, Ohio), so I am also an expert on the NFL Draft. I have also enjoyed playing tennis from a very young age. I can replicate Andy Roddick’s unique serve but at one-third of the speed! I enjoy watches and watchmaking, and I’m not the only musician to be fascinated by them--singer/songwriter John Mayer has an unbelievable watch collection!





8. A large (and attractive) part of this job will be to program, perform in, and headline the Merchant & Gould Concertmaster Series; three pairs of concerts held at the Knoxville Museum of Art. Can you tell us a little bit about what to expect from that series in 2017-18?

In programming the exciting 2017-2018 Merchant and Gould Concertmaster Series, I chose pieces out of a passion to tell the wonderful stories behind the music. Since many of them are pieces from the chamber music repertoire, I get to do it with my new KSO colleagues. The opportunity to perform with them outside of the orchestra is a great way for me to get to know them intimately as musicians. I get to hear their sounds and their musical voices up close for the first time and establish a chemistry. It’s exciting and many of our collaborations coming up are must-see events for this reason!


(From a gondola in the beautiful mountains at the Breckenridge Music Festival)


This post authored by the KSO Communications Dept. and Concertmaster William Shaub.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

A Great May

The closing Masterworks concerts were the most well-attended that I can recall in recent memory. It was also the first time in a LONG time that Beethoven's 5th Symphony has had a fair audience, having had some unfortunate coincidences the past two times it was programmed. In March of 2006, the work's performance fell on the same night that the Lady Vols competed in the NCAA tournament, limiting our attendance, and the time previous to that, (not sure of the date) it snowed. It wasn't just the Beethoven that drew a crowd, though. Mason Bates' Mothership, which included soloists Christina Horn and Jorge Variego, attracted a new element of our community by blurring the genre lines between classical and electronica.

Also at those May concerts, a KSO violist was honored for her work in the area of Music and Wellness. Instead of paraphrasing a perfectly good press release, I'm including the release here…

     KNOXVILLE, TN - May 22, 2017 

     Eunsoon Lee-Corliss, Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Assistant Principal Violist, is one of just five orchestra musicians from across the U.S. to receive the Ford Musician Award for Excellence in Community Service from the League of American Orchestras. The program, made possible by Ford Motor Company Fund, celebrates orchestra musicians and the inspirational work they do in their communities.

     Lee-Corliss will be honored for her exceptional work in the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra’s (KSO) Music & Wellness program, which places professional musicians into healthcare settings to provide live therapeutic music for staff, patients, and their families to enhance the healing process. She will be presented with her award at the League of American Orchestras’ 72nd National Conference in Detroit, June 6-8, and will discuss her work at an elective session for Conference delegates.

Eunsoon and her husband Scott are enjoying an extended trip to New England before she goes to Detroit to accept her award. New England is very lucky.



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On a beautiful Memorial Day Sunday morning in Poughkeepsie, NY, the Vassar College class of 2017 stepped forth into the future. We were on hand to see our son Richard receive his B.A. in Geography. I can't believe how fast that four years went! An astounding, “small-world” aspect of this Commencement was that Vassar's Interim President turns out to be Jonathan Chenette, the father of KSO principal oboist Claire Chenette! A respected pedagogue and accomplished composer, he has had a work performed by the KSO's Principal Woodwind Quintet at the Q Series. It was truly a treat to hear his opening and closing remarks, and to see him hand out 612 diplomas and shake 612 hands. 

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Do Not Dally, Come See Our May Finale

The Masterworks season finale concerts are always a memorable event, and this year is no exception.  There will be a variety of “looks” to the repertoire on these concerts, and it will mark the first appearance of a Keytar in our midst.  Each half of the concert will feature a 21st-century work followed by a standard repertoire classic. Opening will be Mason Bates' 2011 composition Mothership, a purely fun work which sees the orchestra sallying forth into the realm of electronica. The keytar is a small electronic keyboard instrument that is slung around the neck like a guitar, hence the name: KEYboard-guiTAR.  Christina Horn, from Knoxville band Hudson K, will supply the keytar wizardry and Jorge Variego will jam on bass clarinet in the improvisatory Bates work.  Strauss' tone poem Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks will close the first half.  After intermission, we shall present music from the 2002 film Catch Me If You Can composed by movie music luminary John Williams. Entitled Escapades, it is essentially a saxophone concerto featuring saxophone soloist Timothy McAllister, backed up by KSO principal bassist Steve Benne and vibraphonist Clark Harrell. The concert (and the season) will conclude with Beethoven's beloved Symphony No. 5.


Let me clear the air about the Strausses.  There were a bunch.  The one generally known as “The Waltz King” is Johann Strauss Jr., he of “Blue Danube” and Die Fledermaus fame.  His father, Johann Sr., is most remembered for his Radetzky March, which we performed on our most recent Bijou and Maryville Park concerts.  Hey, let's not forget Josef Strauss, Junior's brother, who blessed us with the Pizzicato Polka!  And there was, of course, Levi Strauss, a blues composer.  But no, none of these Viennese kindred; our Strauss du jour will be Richard, an early 20th-century German composer who took up where Wagner and Brahms left off.  His Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks has a cartoon-like, slapstick pace, genius orchestration, and a very prominent e-flat (soprano) clarinet part. Here is just one page from the Strauss score.


Some of my earliest musical memories are of a scratchy LP on our hi-fi, playing Beethoven's 5th.  As I recall, the first movement was far too scratched to play, so I skipped ahead to the second movement. I only remember being able to hear the loud parts of the third movement, and the finale is all loud, so as a punky little 4-year-old, I certainly remembered that.  Fast forward 50-something years, and with a dozen or more performances of the work under my belt, I am still amazed at how the second movement Andante con moto can be so rich and so pure at the same time.  A theme and three variations are presented by the cellos and violas; the one set of excerpts that has been on virtually every orchestra audition I've taken in the past 35 years.  (I wasn't thinking about that at age 4, trust me).  The extended coda patiently and gracefully winds down and even morphs into the centuries-old European theme La Folia.

These concerts will happen Thursday and Friday, May 18 and 19 at 7:30, at the Tennessee Theatre. Hope to see you there!

Tickets are going fast, so secure them online here or call 865-291-3310.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Three Cheers for Blood Sweat and Tears!

On Saturday, May 6, the KSO will host iconic jazz/rock band Blood Sweat and Tears at the Civic Auditorium. This will be a repeat appearance by BS&T, who performed with us in 1999.


The late '60s saw two bands emerging as powerful forces in a “rock big band” genre that they alone created: Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears. Their successes soon inspired formation of similar bands such as Tower of Power, Cold Blood, and the Average White Band. Bands touring today such as the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and St. Paul and the Broken Bones owe a debt of inspiration to this groove outpouring. The difference was that while Chicago enjoyed a long span of hits, (each one seemingly cheesier than the last), they didn't have a number one hit until 1976. On the other hand BS&T's second, eponymous LP, released in late 1968, won a Grammy for Album of the Year, no mean feat considering they were up against the Beatles' last recorded album (Abbey Road), and Crosby, Stills and Nash's first. And if I may, BS&T's eponymous LP (actually their second) refuses to sound dated, whereas the political and “flower power” complexion of some tunes on the first few Chicago albums often has me reaching for the “skip” button on the remote.

As with most legacy bands, there have been quite a few personnel changes over the years, to the point where there are no remaining original members performing with the band. This should not be of concern, as the “sourdough effect” of shared experiences between old members and new has kept the spirit of the original band alive. You don't go to a Yankees game expecting to see Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio, one would hope, and in music, it's the same story.


Come on down to the Civic tomorrow night! What you'll hear will make you So Very Happy.


Doors open at 7:00 p.m. Tickets here.

To hear an interview with lead singer Bo Bice about the upcoming KSO concert on local station Classic Hits 93.1 with radio personality Frank Murphy, click here.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Folklore and Myth

Our April Masterworks concert pair will be a treat for the ears, with classics by Chopin and Ravel, and lesser known works by Bizet and Osvaldo Golijov. Chopin's E Minor Piano Concerto will feature pianist Adam Golka, returning to Knoxville after his performance of Rachmaninov's 3rd Concerto in 2009.



Golijov is an Argentinian composer of Romanian descent who melds two seemingly disparate musical genres-- klezmer and tango-- into one unique style. His music has been championed by Yoyo Ma's Silk Road Ensemble, and a chamber arrangement of this particular work can be found on the SRE's New Impossibilities CD. Two short movements from Bizet's underappreciated opera The Pearl Fishers will usher in the Golijov work in a seamless tableau.


Back in February of 2007, we performed the complete Daphnis and Chloe ballet score (from which this week's Suite is pulled) under the baton of Lucas Richman. It's a lengthy, quirky work, close to an hour long, but when we arrived at the familiar part, (where the 2nd Suite begins) there was such a chill going up my backbone-- like when you see a spectacular sight that you haven't seen since you were a child. This week, the chills will be instantaneous, as the 2nd Suite begins with Ravel's rich depiction of a sunrise over the isle of Lesbos, from where the story originates. Wind players labor for years over the gently bubbling riffs that open the Suite, and the surges of dynamic power recall Esther Williams' synchronized swimming film extravaganzas from the '40s and '50s. Stravinsky called it “one of the most beautiful products in all of French music,” and you, too will be amazed that something so vigorous could also be so beautiful.
   
Thursday & Friday performances begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Tennessee Theatre; tickets here. Facebook event here.
                  
                      

Friday, April 7, 2017

APRIL JEWELS

It's April, and for some people that means only one thing-- golf's Masters Tournament, taking place down in Georgia right now. On Saturday, the 8th, KSO audiences will be treated to the work of a Fiddle Master-- Nova Scotian performer Natalie MacMaster! In addition to the electrifying fiddle work, Ms MacMaster can dance the jig and strathspey like nobody's business. You will be amazed at what a large catalog of songs stems from Canada's Cape Breton tradition, and by the ensemble's dazzling precision. That's Saturday night at 8 at the Civic Auditorium. Be aware that there will be a Knoxville Ice Bears game on the other side of the building, so maybe allowing a little extra time to park will be a good strategy.

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Is it already time for another Q Series concert?? Time flies when you're having fun, I guess. We are happy to provide you all with a smile-inducing smorgasbord of chamber music on Wednesday the 12th at the Square Room. The principal String Quartet is going to divide and conquer, with two duos filling out our half. Violinist Gordon Tsai and violist Katie Gawne will present the Handel-Halvorsen Passacaglia, while violinist Edward Pulgar and I will render for your approval Ravel's 1922 Sonata for Violin and Cello. The Woodwind Quintet will close the show with Endre Szervánsky's Wind Quintet No. 1 from 1953.


When you say “Handel-Halvorsen,” every string player's eyes light up and you can tell you've struck a chord (lol). The Passacaglia starts with a theme written by Handel, then a deftly written series of variations on that theme follows, written by Norwegian composer Johan Halvorsen. Why we don't just call this the Halvorsen “Variations on a Theme by Handel” is beyond me; it would save so much explanation. Both it and the Ravel that follows are virtuoso works that have tremendous effect. This is not the Ravel of the Mother Goose Suite and Bolero, but an entirely different animal. Look for two amusing tunes in it; the first in the wacky 2nd movement which, I believe, inspired the Armor Hot Dogs jingle from the mid-'60s, and in its last movement, one that predicts the J Geils Band's song Centerfold (you know, with the whistling outro... I think it's a strathspey...). Although the Szervánsky quintet is the most recently composed work on the program, you will find it's accessibility pleasantly surprising.