Tuesday, June 30, 2015

COME FORTH ON THE FOURTH!

It's just a few days away, the biggest Independence Day celebration and concert since... last year! Saturday night at 8:00 the KSO will take the stage on the Performance Lawn (formerly the South Lawn, apparently) of World's Fair Park to commemorate the USA's 239th birthday. There will be something for everyone at this party, starting at 4:00 pm with the Regal Cinemas' Kids Zone, and music from bands Handsome and the Humbles, Bantum Rooster and Misty River. As usual, there will be an impressive array of food vendors, a flyover at the start of the concert, and of course, those fabulous fireworks will pack a charge! Here is an official link to Festival on the 4th with more details, as well as a Go Knoxville article with many other attractions

The KSO itself has some goodies up their sleeve. Anyone who tweets to @knoxsymphony, or uses the hashtag #KSOJuly4, will automatically be entered to win a pair of tickets to a KSO Masterworks performance of his/her choice. Resident Conductor James Fellenbaum will lead the orchestra in a program of festive favorites like Sousa's El Capitan and Stars and Stripes Forever, an Armed Forces Salute arranged by Bob Lowden, The Pledge of Allegiance, and John Williams' suite of music from The Patriot. Other great tunes you won't want to miss are Let It Go from Frozen, Ashokan Farewell, Selections from The Sound of Music, and a suite from Williams' landmark score to Star Wars.
Our guest will be soprano Katy Wolfe, who will sing the Pledge and Gershwin's Summertime.
Anyone who has attended the KSO's Very Young People's Concerts (where she is Picardy Penguin's charming sidekick), the Sound Company show choir (which she leads), or one of scads of productions involving her at the Clarence Brown Theatre, is acquainted with Katy's talents.


The concert will be rain or shine, and free parking will be available at several area garages- although the 11th street lot, which is closest to the venue, has had some legendary post-concert traffic snarls. Garages on Locust Street, Walnut Street, State Street & Market Square are just a few blocks walk from the show, and there will be ADA Parking at the Fort Kid Parking Lot. Hope to see you there with bells on!

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Summer Reading List Part 1

Ok, enough lollygagging. It's time to peruse the repertoire for next season for new and challenging (to me) works. I am not including every work from every concert, just the most prickly ones, so refer to the calendar and you won't miss a thing.

I first played the Mendelssohn Overture to the Hebrides (September 27th Chamber Classics) as a freshman in high school. I found it super difficult then, but very rewarding to finally get it right. The BSO used it as background music to Tanglewood's advertisements on TV back then, showing a car (I guess) driving up the twisty, conifer-lined road leading to the Tanglewood Center. The transcendence of this piece compelled me to mention Mendelssohn in my high school Yearbook write-up. Only once since then have I performed it, in February of 1990 with the KSO. I'd say it's about time, and maestro Jim Fellenbaum thought so, too.

October has a trio of new works for me to Starting with the Concertmaster Series shows on the 14th and 15th, it's Mendelssohn again! And it's a trio. This time, the D Minor piano Trio. How I have missed this gem so long escapes me. I have actually performed the slow movement a couple times, but never the whole thing. Shostakovich's brilliant 1st Symphony, with guest conductor Marcelo Lehninger, comes the very next week, bringing with it a monster cello solo that takes some “living with.” This concert concludes with Resphigi's Pines of Rome, which is no, umm, walk in the park.

On the first of November, “October 32nd,” it's the Haffner Symphony. Every string player's audition nightmare. Mozart's most challenging symphony caps off a lush Chamber Classics concert that also features Mozart's timeless Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and Wagner's tender Sigfried Idyll. The other end of November brings guest conductor Shizuo Kuwahara, with two works that I doubt many of our current corps of players have performed; Rachmaninoff's 3rd Symphony and Rodion Shchedrin's 1963 Concerto for Orchestra No. 1 (aka “Naughty Limericks”). Run, do not walk to youTube (here, let your fingers do the running) and check this work out, it's a hum-dinger in the best sense of the word and probably some of the jazziest Russian music ever. These two works will be sandwiched around Tchaikovsky's immortal Piano Concerto No. 1, featuring pianist Stewart Goodyear.

After Christmas, chamber music will be my mantra for a couple weeks in January. While last year's Principal Quartet concert came five months earlier than it had the year before, just after Halloween, this coming season's show rides into town hot on Santa's heels. Three new-to-me (but loved-by-me) works will appear on the January 10th program: Schubert's Quartettsatz “(Quartet Movement),” Prokofieff's 2nd Quartet, and Brahm's 3rd Quartet. Three amazing works whose dry, unassuming titles sadly give no clue to the brilliance that lay within. A scant four days later, Gabe Lefkowitz and Friends (pianist Kevin Class, violist Katy Gawne and I) will collaborate on Dvorak's rollicking Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat. This is a late work of Dvorak that I have been waiting a long time to play. The time has come to break it out of hiding, because that cello part is a BEAR.


You know what else is a bear? Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture. Our Independence Day Concert is fast approaching and I know that camera is gonna be on me... So I'll finish out the season in a future post. Goodnight!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Celebrate July 4 with a BANG!




This Independence Day, a thirty-year tradition continues as the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra performs patriotic music with a spectacular fireworks display on Saturday, July 4 at World's Fair Park.


This concert is free to attend; no tickets are required. View program here.

The Festival on the Fourth, presented by the City of Knoxville, begins at 4:00 p.m. with food vendors, entertainment, and family-friendly activities. As dusk draws near, the Knoxville Symphony members will take the stage for the KSO 31st Annual FREE Pilot Flying J Independence Day Concert at 8:00 p.m.

During the Armed Forces Salute, audience members stand when the song of their Military branch is played; a moving moment every year.



KSO Resident Conductor James Fellenbaum conducts the Orchestra
in the Star Spangled Banner, Armed Forces Salute and more recognizable tunes including "Rocky Top," "76 Trombones," and music from Disney's Frozen and classics from the Sound of Music.

Talented soprano Katy Wolfe will solo for these classics. Katy is a well-known local singer who is no stranger to sharing the stage with the KSO. She has performed in holiday concerts and has held a leading role in the Very Young People’s Concerts, a symphony orchestra performance designed for students in Kindergarten through second grades.


Blankets and lawn chairs are encouraged for this free, family-friendly event. Should you choose to enjoy the concert from your couch, the performance will be live broadcasted on WBIR-TV Channel 10 at 8:00 p.m. EST. Don't forget the fireworks!


This post authored Rachel Dellinger, KSO Director of Communications

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Dearly Beloved...

Our big, happy KSO family has taken on a couple of new members in the past few months. In two seperate celebrations, (and the events leading up to them), wedding bells have (re-)acquainted us with two fine men.

On March 29th, our Assistant Principal Second Violinist, Ruth Bacon, became Ruth Bacon Edewards. Her husband, tenor and conductor Ace Edewards, is a very recent (last month!) recipient of a DMA in Orchestral Conducting from the University of Arizona, Tucson. The wedding was in Albuquerque, NM, her home town, but a reception was held for us easterners on May 17th at Remedy Coffee.





AND, just two days ago, violinist Sara Matayoshi and clarinetist Peter Cain were wed at the Lighthouse Knoxville. You may remember Peter from his stint as Principal Clarinet here when Gary Sperl spent the 2011-12 season in Tanzania. Peter now holds the 3rd / bass clarinet position with the Dayton Philharmonic, and is the clarinet professor at Lee University in Cleveland, TN.




Our best to the happy couples! More proof of music's ability to bring people together.

Monday, May 25, 2015

The End of an Era

Hello!  Yes, it has been a while, and what a while it has been!  The close of Maestro Richman's tenure was fulfilling and fun.  The audiences for last Thursday and Friday's Masterworks concerts stood immediately upon his entrance in a very heartfelt and deserved tribute.  Concertmaster Gabriel Lefkowitz's performance of the Tchaikovsky Concerto rivaled any I had witnessed, and the orchestra as a unit shone throughout the Mahler and Ravel which wrapped things up.

I can't imagine any new Music Director coming to Knoxville and facing the culture shock that our city must surely present. One telling instance was at an early September outdoor concert, where he announced the artist for the Opening Gala concert.  “Martin Short!” he said, and there. was. nothing. in response from the audience.  It was still relatively soon after 9/11, and the orchestra had been having some deficits.  The idea that a Music Director whose experience was rooted on the West Coast, as opposed to Western Europe (to which the orchestra had for the previous three decades become accustomed) represented a major change of direction for the organization, and particularly the board.  In no time at all, though, Lucas drew a bead on the town.  His focus on American music and his awareness of diverse repertoire earned him the respect of both younger and older audiences. His seamless assimilation into and continuation of the tradition of the Clayton Holiday Concerts was impressive.  It must be said that compared to the town to which Lucas came in 2003, Knoxville is now culturally head and shoulders taller, and some of this is his doing.  The orchestra is deeper, more visible and more efficient.

Most importantly, though, the celebrations and parties really hit their marks! Lol. The first fete was on April 30th at the Emporium Building on Gay St., downstairs from the KSO offices.  County Mayor Tim Burchett made a proclamation and awarded the Maestro permanent citizenship in Knoxville, as well as the rank of “Colonel.”  In addition, after the Friday night Masterworks concert, Club LeConte was opened up to the players and other guests for one final goodbye gala.

                                      Some fun photo ops came along at both events, enjoy!


A major jewel in the crown of Maestro Richman's tenure was the Music and Wellness Program. Here is Lucas, with (from the left) violist Eunsoon Corliss, cellist Stacy Miller, violinists Sean Claire, Ilia Steinschneider and Sara Matayoshi.


Here is County Mayor Tim Burchett in a selfie-op with the Maestro, proclamation in hand.


Lots of people in this shot from the Emporium! Hard to pinpoint who is who, but sort of left-to-right, Ruth Bacon, Gabe Lefkowitz, Chase Hawkins, Rachel Loseke, Ikuko Koizumi, Sean Donovan, Stacy Miller, Eunsoon Corliss, Alice Stuart, Brad MacDougal, MAESTRO, Sean Claire, Sara Matayoshi, Cindy Hicks,Gordon Tsai, Aaron Apaza, Steve Benne, and Yan Peng.



 From the Club LeConte reception.  Again left-to-right-ish, Edward Pulgar, Sean Claire, Gabe Lefkowitz, Katy Gawne, Eunsoon Corliss, Julie Swenson, MAESTRO, Helen Bryenton, yours truly, Stacy Miller, Sara Ringer, Sara Matayoshi, Mary Pulgar, Claire Chenette (with the EYES), Bill Pierce, Elizabeth Farr, Jill Bartine.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

A Rousing Farewell

Has it really been twelve seasons? The Knoxville Symphony under maestro Lucas Richman has been going on fast forward for many years now. It has found its way into the ears and hearts of people from many new realms locally and regionally, while still holding the interest of long-time supporters. Keeping an orchestra of our size afloat in post-9/11 America has proven treacherous for many sister organizations, but Lucas has worked in concert with at least three different Executive Directors to keep our ship aright, and for the last seven years, in the black. The Music and Wellness Program, the Very Young People's Concerts (featuring THE ONE-AND-ONLY PICARDY PENGUIN!!!) the Q Series, Story Time Concerts and other initiatives have all given the KSO a lot of cred. Both downtown Knoxville and the KSO have seen wholesale changes for the better in the last ten years or so that have created an even more liveable and vibrant city. Knoxville is no longer a stopover on the way to Asheville, Gatlinburg, or Chattanooga, as it was when I moved here in '86; it is a destination.

So with all the new points on the compass that the orchestra touches now, it sometimes gets overlooked how the orchestra has also improved its overall sound, through both the crafting of that sound, and the attracting- and retaining- of quality players. The music that Lucas has chosen for his farewell concert spotlights the versatility that the orchestra has come into. Three of the greatest symphonists ( Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Mahler) and the greatest orchestrator (Ravel) will be uniquely brought together, this Thursday and Friday at 7:30 at the Tennessee Theatre.

Beethoven's overture to Goethe's play Egmont has three parts: a slow introduction which morphs into a tension-filled Allegro in f minor. Release comes with the Allegro con brio coda in f major, in some of Beethoven's most triumphant, pedal-to-the-metal writing. The stage is then set for concertmaster Gabe Lefkowitz's solo appearance on the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. This work is famous for fooling listeners into applauding at the end of the first movement., which truly sounds like the end of something, but hang on... there are two more movements. The second movement Canzonetta is serene and contemplative, but is interrupted by the Allegro vivacissimo finale bursting through the door. I guarantee some audience members will literally jump out of their seats at the sound of the finale's downbeat.

The presence of the Egmont Overture and the Tchaikovsky concerto might make you think this will be a typical overture/concerto/symphony program, but that mold is long broke. On the second half of the program, contrasting moods continue to be order of the day, with the Adagio from Mahler's Symphony No. 10 (the only movement of that work completed by the composer), and Ravel's tone poem La Valse will be paired in a sort of Viennese synopsis. Ravel's work comments on the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire by deconstructing that empire's dance-of-choice, the Waltz, whereas the Mahler is a snapshot of the transition from the First to the Second Viennese School of composition.

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Maestro Richman's Final Bijou Concert

It must be May, because music is flying at me and out of me in all directions. Between last Sunday (Il trovatore) and this coming Sunday's Chamber Orchestra concert, I will have had six completely different performances of various genres. I am happy just to have brought the right music, the right instrument, and the right attire. Next week is much easier, only three different performances...

And now more about that Knoxville Symphony Chamber Orchestra concert, 2:30 Sunday at the Bijou. Maestro Lucas Richman's Bijou Theatre farewell will be a concert of masterpieces from the chamber orchestra and wind band literature; Richard Strauss' Serenade in E-flat for 13 Winds, William Schuman's Symphony for Strings, and Brahms' Serenade No. 1 in D. On the surface the program appears to be all-German, but remember this is mid-20th-century American composer William Schuman, with one “N”, not Robert with two.

The Strauss Serenade holds a special place in my heart, because I don't have to play it! But seriously, if you take Mozart's Wind Serenades and kind of give them a small dose of complexity, you'll have an idea of what to expect here. It's an early work, nestled between the Cello Sonata and the momentous First Horn Concerto. It's always a rare treat to LISTEN to a piece of music at work, and our winds ROCK!

Next comes the William Schuman. Although his music has been more in the mainstream in the past, it has for some sad reason become less frequently heard. Known for his orchestration of Ives' Variations on “America” for organ, his Credendum: Article of Faith was performed here under Kirk Trevor in October of 1992, oddly enough coupled with ROBERT Schumann's 2nd Symphony. Wow, tough night for the violins. ANYway, the striking harmonies and excitable rhythms of this String Symphony should wipe away any doubt of Schuman's presence in the upper echelon of 20th-century American composers.


Brahms' op. 11 Serenade (like the Strauss, a youthful work) which closes the concert, is pure bliss. A symphony in all but its title, you can literally hear him develop as the work progresses. The first Scherzo forecasts the theme of his 2nd Piano Concerto's Scherzo in an eery way, but all six movements are drop-dead gorgeous and iconic. I played this work before I played any of the Brahms symphonies, heck, I thought they were all this good! Fusing together the separated camps of woodwinds and strings that performed on the first half of the concert is an ingenious programming touch that is typical of the classy details for which Maestro Richman will be missed. We hope YOU are not missed on Sunday afternoon, come on out!